Marine Life attached to the hull when it is sunk

When the ex-HMAS Adelaide is sunk off Avoca Beach on the NSW Central Coast it is likely to have lots of marine life attached to the hull already which will be of great interest to people wanting to dive the HMAS Adelaide. The ship was in dry dock in September 2008.

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HMAS Adelaide in dry dock being prepared or sinking. Photo Courtesy Bob Diaz, Pro-dive Central Coast

The hull of the HMAS Adelaide was clean at this time when preparation for sinking was being undertaken.

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Hull of the ex-HMAS Adelaide when in dry dock September 2008, note how clean the hull is. Photo Courtesy Bob Diaz, Pro-dive Central Coast

However, when back in the water, the hulls of ships get rapidly colonised with many marine organisms. Sponges, barnicles, shells, seaweed,worms and other marine life can attach themselves to any surface exposed to seawater. An aluminium dinghy that is moored at Hardy’s Bay, not for from the proposed scuttling site of the ex-HMAS Adelaide at Avoca Beach, was cleaned only 3 months ago and shows lots of marine life colonising the aluminium hull.

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Marine life on the hull of an aluminium dinghy at Hardy's Bay

Marine life attached to a dinghy at Hardy's Bay NSW

Sponges, red seaweed and other marine life on the hull of an aluminium dinghy 3 moths since last cleaned

Marine Life from the bottom of a dinghy

Marine life scraped off the hull of an aluminium dinghy at Hardy's Bay near the scuttling site of the ex-HMAS Adelaide

The ex-HMAS Adelaide has, of course, a different surface to the aluminium dinghy and has been exposed to seawater a lot longer than 3 months, so it will be really interesting to dive the HMAS Adelaide and see what marine life is attached to the ship when it is sunk off Avoca Beach. The other interesting aspect is whether the marine life that is attached will remain attached, given that the growing conditions at White Bay in Sydney Harbour, where the ship is moored at the moment at the moment,  are very different to the conditions in 30m of water off Avoca Beach. Seeing the marine life evolve on the surfaces of the ex-HMAS Adelaide over time when diving the HMAS Adelaide wreck will be fascinating.

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